Crews Environmental has been doing septic system work in this area for more than 30 years. In that time we’ve learned a lot about what to do and what not to do. It’s important to us that our customers be educated on the process that we use to troubleshoot, diagnose, survey and plan new septic system installations or drainfield repairs. The process has been refined over the years and while it might be surprising to some, we do not give written septic system installation estimates without a permit from the Department of Health.

When tree roots start going into your drainfield it can cause serious issues with backups, poor drainage and even require repairs. While there are a number of things you can do to prevent tree and plant roots from infiltrating your drainfield – you also need to know what signs to look for. Here are a few symptoms that are indicators that tree roots have grown into your drainfield:

Your septic system installation was a costly investment. With most new systems costing between $5,000 and $10,000, protecting that investment is crucial. Poor septic system maintenance, overloading your system, and parking cars on your drainfield are just a few things that can cause drainfield failure. But an issue that you may not consider frequently is tree roots. As the trees on your property age and grow, their root systems become extremely complex and can even interfere with your drainfield if the tree is planted to close to your drainfield.

Your septic system is a large investment. Proper septic system installation costs several thousand dollars. For this reason, it’s important not only to pumpout your system regularly, but also to make sure that your drainfield can function optimally. When your drainfield is failing, your tank will need to be pumped more often. If you’re experiencing issues with your drainfield, here are the most common causes for the drainfield failure:

© 2015 Crews Environmental